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Back for the boardroom, Microsoft outlines the future of the Surface Hub

Microsoft Surface Hub 2The Surface Hub 2 is still slated for an early 2019 release.

Back in the spring, Microsoft shared its vision for taking over executive boardrooms, the Surface Hub 2 — a modular 4k video wall that companies could use to spruce up conferences and usher in a new world of digital office communication. While the Surface Hub 2 is still unavailable to the general public, Microsoft wants to let you know that it has a few more ideas for the workplace, including the new Surface Hub 2S and Surface Hub 2X.

Advertising the next generation of your product offerings generally isn’t a great idea when you current generation has yet to hit the market, just ask the Osborne corporation, but that doesn’t seem to be stopping the folks at Microsoft. At the company’s 2018 Ignite developer conference, it was proud to announce that it would be moving forward with the Surface Hub, an idea initially unveiled in 2015.

The new Surface Hub 2S is a slimmed down version of Microsoft’s standard Surface Hub 2 digital whiteboard, set to target businesses who may already have the first generation of the Surface Hubs within its offices. Based around older software, the Surface Hub 2S will fit perfectly into office spaces in which employees are accustomed to the first generation Hub, but want a bit of a style upgrade.

On the other hand, the Surface Hub 2X is garnered as the next generation of Surface Hub, after the regular Surface Hub 2. Why Microsoft doesn’t opt to name this new generation the Surface Hub 3 we can’t tell you, but we can say that they are ready to add on new features. The Surface Hub 2X will support the ability to tilt and rotate the display, as well as allow multiuser login, and compatibility with Microsoft 365.

While Microsoft plans on launching the Surface Hub 2 and 2S and in the first half of 2019, those interested in the future Surface Hub 2X won’t see a release until at least 2020. The early announcement is curious as while it leads excellent insight into Microsoft’s devotion for the workplace platform, it may put some organizations off, pushing them to skip the current generation for promises of better future experiences.

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