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The best headlamps for 2019

Think your flashlight does the trick when camping or backpacking? Try camping or backpacking with a headlamp just once and the experience will be … illuminating. After all, even simple tasks such as lighting a match and chopping wood require two hands. While your precious Maglite may moonlight as a weapon against rampant bears, it’s far too cumbersome when you’re trying to cook a backcountry meal under a banner of stars.

Alas, not all headlamps are created equal. Like most camping gear, they become more durable and functional as their price tags rise. Fret not — we’ve picked the best headlamps that represent what’s available at different price points, whether you’re looking for a low- or high-budget source of light.

There are a few things to consider before purchasing. Depending on how you intend to use your headlamp, factors such as weight, comfort, durability, beam distance, and regularity all play a major factor. Though manufacturing specs tend to exaggerate when it comes to certain features — ahem, lumen output and battery life — the headlamps below rarely disappoint in either category.

Ledlenser MH10

The best

The best headlamps for 2019

Why you should buy this headlamp? The MH10 is as well-rounded as they get for under $100.

Who it’s for? Individuals looking for a high-lumen output headlamp that won’t break the bank.

How much will it cost? $80 MSRP

Why we chose the LedLenser :

The Ledlenser MH10 is the most versatile headlamp we’ve seen and is our pick as the best overall unit. The Adjustable Focus System enables quick single-handed lighting adjustments from spot to flood with a simple twist of the front bezel. Nowadays, most top of the line headlamps are rechargeable, however, unlike some models, the MH10’s 18650 Li-ion rechargeable battery can reach an 80 percent charge in just four hours and a full charge in roughly six.

To prevent accidental battery drains during transport, the MH10 has a lock switch to keep it from powering on in a stuffed duffel. A built-in red rear light isn’t necessary for all situations, but cyclists will enjoy the added luminescence on evening rides. As anyone who’s ever slept overnight in a stuffy tent knows, the last thing you want while setting up a tent and bedding is excess heat coming from your headlamp. Thankfully, the MH10 has a temperature control system to keep the LED headlamp cool on your skull during use — even while emitting up to 600 lumens of light.

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